Kaiser Chiefs - The Big Feastival - 25th - 27th August 2017
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Kaiser Chiefs

Sunday

Things could so easily have stayed the same. After more than 10 years, four albums, platinum record sales, a volley of top ten singles and 3 Brit Awards, it would have been simple for Kaiser Chiefs to sit back and coast a while, to enjoy the warm glow of being one of Britain’s most cherished bands. 

But in late 2012 there came a change: the departure of founder member and drummer Nick Hodgson. Yet an event that might have derailed the band entirely instead it lit a fire that has carried the Kaiser Chiefs forward, through a period of re-evaluation and reinforcement, to create an album that is their most considered, literate, and impassioned record to date. 

Education, Education, Education & War began out of frustration. The band’s remaining members, lead singer and lyricist Ricky Wilson, bassist Simon Rix, guitarist Andrew White and keyboardist Nick Baines, decamped to Real World to see if they could kindle something new. In the days that followed, the sense of neutered creativity gave way to something thrilling and unleashed. By the end of that week, Rix recalls, they had “Nineteen or 20 ideas for songs.” And more importantly, Wilson says, “We had the spark that gave us hope.” “At first the songs came from a very personal anger,” explains Wilson. “But then I thought back to what I’d enjoyed writing about in the beginning, with Employment, and what I enjoyed then was looking around and writing about what I saw. And so over the next year I began to write songs about living in this country, about the thoughts that inspired in me.”

The Kaiser Chiefs that emerged from near-collapse in 2012 appear regalvanaised, bolstered by the addition of a new drummer, Vijay Mistry [formerly of Club Smith] and inspired by a new sense of freedom and musical possibility. They are angry, yes, but they are also inspired and ambitious and hungry for success. 

The album was recorded in Atlanta, Georgia — a move that gave the band the opportunity to view themselves from a new perspective. “In a weird way working in America has been good for us, because unlike some bands who work in America and end up sounding American, I think it’s solidified how British we are,” says Wilson. 

But above all these are songs carried by the pluck and romance of hope. This is a band reformed and recharged, they say, a band that knows just what’s possible with faith and solidarity and a refusal to accept defeat. “You and me on the front line, you and me and every time,” runs Bows and Arrows, the album’s battle-cry, an anthem for both this band and these times. “We the people, created equal,” it storms. “We the people, created equal … And if that’s true then we’re not the only ones.”